Life Among Pages

Book Reviews and Personal Musings

Month: July 2017

Mid Year Book Haul 2017

Mid year book haul, all the book I bought from january 2017 to June 2017

I haven’t been able to do any haul posts on here, because I am constantly putting myself on super strict book buying bans. Which I broke, exponentially last month.

This means I now have the fun job of finding space on my already quite full bookcase for these lovelies, but I also get to share what I got with you guys.

So I thought the best way for me to do hauls would be if I just did a post every six months so that enough books would acuminate to be worth mentioning.

Let me know what you think.

Read More

The Art of Asking by Amanda Palmer | Review

Disclosure: Please note that links to merchants mentioned within this post might be using an affiliate link which means that – at zero cost to you – I might earn a commission if you buy something through that affiliate link.

The Art of Asking by Amanda Palmer, held in front of a building under construction and a tree.

 4 stars

“From what I’ve seen, it isn’t so much the act of asking that paralyses us–it’s what lies beneath: the fear of being vulnerable, the fear of rejection, the fear of looking needy or weak. The fear of being seen as a burdensome member of the community instead of a productive one. It points, fundamentally, to our separation from one another.” 

This book was incredibly different to what I expected, but in a way it was also much more. At first, I had thought it would be a mild advice book, backed up with analogies from her life. However, it was more of a memoir than self help, but that doesn’t mean you cant learn from Amanda’s experiences.

The Art of Asking; or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Let People Help is a very in-depth look into the life of Amanda Palmer up close, personal, and without a filter. It proves that even though she lives an insane life, and is very well known musician. She is just a person, like you and me. She is flawed, makes mistakes, and has fears and anxiety about life, just like everybody else. Which is why it was exactly what I needed to read, much of what she said resonated strongly with me.

Rock star, crowd funding pioneer, and TED speaker Amanda Palmer knows all about asking. Performing as a living statue in a wedding dress, she wordlessly asked thousands of passers-by for their dollars. When she became a singer, songwriter, and musician, she was not afraid to ask her audience to support her as she surfed the crowd (and slept on their couches while touring). And when she left her record label to strike out on her own, she asked her fans to support her in making an album, leading to the world’s most successful music Kickstarter.

Even while Amanda is both celebrated and attacked for her fearlessness in asking for help, she finds that there are important things she cannot ask for-as a musician, as a friend, and as a wife. She learns that she isn’t alone in this, that so many people are afraid to ask for help, and it paralyses their lives and relationships. In this groundbreaking book, she explores these barriers in her own life and in the lives of those around her, and discovers the emotional, philosophical, and practical aspects of THE ART OF ASKING.” (Summary from Goodreads)

“As I moved through my life as a statue and later as a musician, I started to understand. There’s a difference between wanting to be looked at and wanting to be seen.” 

Read More

June Wrap Up & July TBR

Welcome to my monthly book wrap up and TBR. June was a fair effort and as I write this, I am two books ahead of schedule according to Goodreads. Therefore, I am pleased with that.

June was a great month, I attended Supanova and met two authors, so keep an eye out for a post all about that. I got a LOT of new books last month, from the mail and second hand. I also recently signed up to Netgalley, so I have started to read a couple eARC’s, and I’m excited about the opportunities that could eventually bring.

In June I read three books, I had planned on four, but like I mentioned above I am currently ahead of schedule so I’m okay with this.

Wrap Up

  • The Secret Circle: The Temptation by L.J. Smith. I have now completed the series, and oh boy did it take a turn. I only recently realised that the last few books weren’t actually written by the original author but were taken away from her and given to someone else but they still printed her name on the cover. This is just awful. These books weren’t the best, but they were nice filler for when I was out and wanted to read something on my phone. Therefore, in protest for the treatment of the author, I shan’t be reviewing the series on my blog because I don’t condone the treatment of the author and therefore won’t give any more support to the series. I am glad I know how it wrapped up. However, I probably won’t be rereading this in the future.
  • Hansel & Gretel by Neil Gaiman. I picked this book up this month at a bookstall at Supanova and just had to read it. I adore Neil Gaiman and the way he can spin a tale. However, this felt like it was missing the Gaiman twist, his spark to take something and remake it. I suppose maybe he was limited with what he could do with this, and sure, the writing was spot on it just read the same as any Hansel & Gretel The images did add an entire level of eerie to the mix. Overall, I quite enjoyed the book it just left me wanting.
  • The Infernal Devices: Clockwork Princess by Cassandra Clare. I feel a lot of melancholy being done with this series; I enjoyed this trilogy more than the Mortal Instruments series (which I still have one book to get through). I loved the atmosphere that being set in Victorian London brought with it. I loved the characters and even though it had another clichéd love triangle, I thought this was handled much better than the original series. It saddens me that it’s all wrapped up. In fact, the epilogue had me literally sobbing I experienced so many emotions. I’m a sucker for the time-lapse montage, so this just hit me right in the heart, Would highly recommend this series, especially since you don’t have to read the other series for it to make sense.

Read More

Vassa in the Night by Sarah Porter | Review

Disclosure: Please note that links to merchants mentioned within this post might be using an affiliate link which means that – at zero cost to you – I might earn a commission if you buy something through that affiliate link.

Vassa in the Night by Sarah Porter lying on the tiles surrounded by paper stars

4 stars 

“Why did it take me so many years to understand that Night is something you can talk to, something that might even decide to watch over you or kiss you just when you’re about to crumple from loneliness?” 

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. A few book reviews I had seen online warned that it’s strange, and won’t be everyone’s cup of tea etc. well it was definitely mine. I was enthralled. I do agree that it does have an odd vibe, but I did not find it as strange as some people made it out to be.

“In the enchanted kingdom of Brooklyn, the fashionable people put on cute shoes, go to parties in warehouses, drink on rooftops at sunset, and tell themselves they’ve arrived. A whole lot of Brooklyn is like that now—but not Vassa’s working-class neighbourhood.

In Vassa’s neighbourhood, where she lives with her stepmother and bickering stepsisters, one might stumble onto magic, but stumbling away again could become an issue. Babs Yagg, the owner of the local convenience store, has a policy of beheading shoplifters—and sometimes-innocent shoppers as well. So when Vassa’s stepsister sends her out for light bulbs, in the middle of night, she knows it could easily become a suicide mission.

But Vassa has a bit of luck hidden in her pocket, a gift from her dead mother. Erg is a tough-talking wooden doll with sticky fingers, a bottomless stomach, and a ferocious cunning. With Erg’s help, Vassa just might be able to break the witch’s curse and free her Brooklyn neighbourhood. But Babs won’t be playing fair” (Summary from Goodreads)

Read More

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén