Life Among Pages

Book Reviews and Personal Musings

Tag: 3 stars

The Loneliness of Distant Beings by Kate Ling | Review

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cover of the Loneliness of Distant Beings by Kate Ling, beside purple fake flowers, and Read Under the Stars bookmark by CreateExploreRead

2.5 stars


“It is that quick, it is that strong, it is that beautiful. And it is totally impossible.” 

I had a strange relationship with The Loneliness of Distant Beings, it held my interest enough when I was actively reading but as soon as I put it down to do something else it would all fade from memory and I didn’t feel like I had to pick it back up. I just sort of felt a bit meh about it all.

“Even though she knows it’s impossible, Seren longs to have the sunshine on her skin. It’s something she feels she needs to stay sane. But when you’re floating through space at thousands of kilometres an hour, sometimes you have to accept there are things you cannot change.

Except that the arrival of Dom in her life changes everything in ways she can barely comprehend. For a while he becomes the Sun for her; and she can’t help but stay in his orbit. Being with him flaunts every rule designed to keep their home in order, but to lose him would be like losing herself.

In the end they must decide what is most important: loyalty to the only home they’ve ever known, or to each other?” Summary from Goodreads.

Please be advised there are some spoilers beyond this point.

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An Uncertain Grace by Krissy Kneen | ARC Review

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Cover of An Uncertain Grace by Krissy Kneen on my iPad next to a vase of purple flowers

3.5 stars

“You know, what makes you human is individual variations moving away from the median data. If you were neutral, if you were just in the middle of all the graphs and charts, then you would be no one. You would be a zero. You would be a computer.”

THANK YOU TO TEXT PUBLISHING & NETGALLEY FOR GIVING ME AN EGALLEY OF THIS BOOK IN RETURN FOR AN HONEST REVIEW

An Uncertain Grace is unlike any I have read before, mostly because it isn’t in my usual genres. That being said whilst I did find it highly unusual, I quite enjoyed it. The novel isn’t broken into chapters; instead, it was broken into five parts, each about a completely different character (Casper, Ronnie, Cameron, M, Liv).

“Some time in the near future, university lecturer Caspar receives a gift from a former student called Liv: a memory stick containing a virtual narrative. Hooked up to a virtual reality bodysuit, he becomes immersed in the experience of their past sexual relationship. But this time it is her experience. What was for him an erotic interlude, resonant with the thrill of seduction, was very different for her – and when he has lived it, he will understand how.

Later…
A convicted paedophile recruited to Liv’s experiment in collective consciousness discovers a way to escape from his own desolation.
A synthetic boy, designed by Liv’s team to ‘love’ men who desire adolescents, begins to question the terms of his existence.
L, in transition to a state beyond gender, befriends Liv, in transition to a state beyond age.
Liv herself has finally transcended the corporeal – but there is still the problem of love.” – Summary from Goodreads

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Her by Garry Disher | ARC Review

Disclosure: Please note that links to merchants mentioned within this post might be using an affiliate link which means that – at zero cost to you – I might earn a commission if you buy something through that affiliate link.

Cover of Her by Garry Dishner on a glass table with a potted chive plant

3 stars.

“Out in that country the sun smeared the sky and nothing ever altered, except that one day a scrap man came by with his wife, who had cost him twelve shillings once upon a time, and a wispy girl, who had cost him ten.”

THANK YOU TO TEXT PUBLISHING & NETGALLEY FOR GIVING ME AN EGALLEY OF THIS BOOK IN RETURN FOR AN HONEST REVIEW

Her is definitely not my usual genre of reading, so it took me some time to get into it. That being said it was also a very quick read and I finished in a couple of days.

“Out in that country the sun smeared the sky and nothing ever altered, except that one day a scrap man came by . . .

Her name is scarcely known or remembered. All in all, she is worth less than the nine shillings and sixpence counted into her father’s hand. She bides her time. She does her work.

Way back in the corner of her mind is a thought she is almost too frightened to shine a light on: one day she will run away.” – Summary from Goodreads

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Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children | Film Review

Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children movie ticket alongside the book and a pouch and black rose.

3.5 stars

When Jacob discovers clues to a mystery that spans different worlds and times, he finds a magical place known as Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. But the mystery and danger deepen as he gets to know the residents and learns about their special powers… and their powerful enemies. Ultimately, Jacob discovers that only his own special “peculiarity” can save his new friends.” (Source: IMDB.com)

Earlier this year I read Miss Peregrine’s Home For Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs and I quite enjoyed it. So, when I heard they were adapting it to a film I knew I had to see it. However, the trailer alone had already filled me with quite a bit of doubt. Unfortunately, I’m one of those moviegoers who if I’ve read the book previously can’t help but mentally notice all the differences, and sometimes outwardly display my displeasure at the changes. So, when I saw this I made sure to go with a group of friends who had all read the book, so we could all air our grievances together.

This review is going to be spoiler heavy, so please don’t read any further if you have not read the book or seen the movie.

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Let It Snow by John Green, Maureen Johnson and Lauren Myracle | Review

Disclosure: Please note that links to merchants mentioned within this post might be using an affiliate link which means that – at zero cost to you – I might earn a commission if you buy something through that affiliate link.

Let It Snow by John Green, Maureen Johnson and Lauren Myracle book lying beside paper snowflakes

3.5 – 4 stars

Let It Snow reminds me of Love Actually, where it tells a few stories about incredibly different characters, but in the end, you realise that they are all connected in some way. It’s a trend Hollywood loves these days. That was this book, though I hope that isn’t a deterrent, because it’s an enjoyable light hearted read.

Let it Snow is split into three short stories, each written by a different author: ‘The Jubilee Express’ by Maureen Johnson, ‘A Cheertastic Christmas Miracle’ by John Green, and ‘The Patron Saint of Pigs’ by Lauren Myracle.

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Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs | Review

Disclosure: Please note that links to merchants mentioned within this post might be using an affiliate link which means that – at zero cost to you – I might earn a commission if you buy something through that affiliate link.

photo of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children book beside a Halloween skull candy bowl.

3.5 stars

 

“I had always known the sky was full of mysteries—but not until now had I realized how full of them the earth was.” 

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children tells the story of Jacob Portman, and the stories his grandfather told him, the ones he daren’t believe were true.

“A horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.” [summary from Goodreads]

I’d heard about this book for a while, but since the movie has been announced, I decided that I needed to read the book before I saw the adaptation. I borrowed a copy from my friend and was surprised by how quickly I read it.

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