Life Among Pages

Book Reviews and Personal Musings

Tag: Fantasy

Library Of Souls by Ransom Riggs | Review

Disclosure: Please note that links to merchants mentioned within this post might be using an affiliate link which means that – at no extra cost to you – I might earn a commission if you buy something through that affiliate link.

All three covers of the Miss Peregrine series, including Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children, Hollow City, and Library of Souls by Ransom Riggs, surrounded by the vintage photos from the books included in the hardcover boxset

4 stars

“What a beautiful day to go to hell” 

This was a great continuation in the series, this might be my favourite of the Peregrine’s series. This was insanely action packed, lots of twists and character reveals, I was hooked.

When I was reading Library of Souls I thought it was the final book in the series, the ending was nicely wrapped up. However, at the time of writing this a fourth book, Map of Days, has been published, which surprised me. So I’ll be interested to see where the series goes from here.

“The adventure that began with Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children and continued in Hollow City comes to a thrilling conclusion with Library of Souls. As the story opens, sixteen-year-old Jacob discovers a powerful new ability, and soon he’s diving through history to rescue his peculiar companions from a heavily guarded fortress. Accompanying Jacob on his journey are Emma Bloom, a girl with fire at her fingertips, and Addison MacHenry, a dog with a nose for sniffing out lost children.

They’ll travel from modern-day London to the labyrinthine alleys of Devil’s Acre, the most wretched slum in all of Victorian England. It’s a place where the fate of peculiar children everywhere will be decided once and for all. Like its predecessors, Library of Souls blends thrilling fantasy with never-before-published vintage photography to create a one-of-a-kind reading experience”Summary from Goodreads.

“There was something sweet about holding a tangible thing that had been touched and marked upon by someone I loved.”

Read More

Hollow City by Ransom Riggs | Review

Disclosure: Please note that links to merchants mentioned within this post might be using an affiliate link which means that – at no extra cost to you – I might earn a commission if you buy something through that affiliate link.

Miss Peregrines: Hollow City by Ransom Riggs beside vintage photos that are included in the hardcover box set edition of the series and with a canvas pouch featuring a quote from the book on it.

4 stars


“I liked this idea: that peculiarness wasn’t a deficiency, but an abundance; that it wasn’t we who lacked something normals had, but they who lacked peculiarness. That we were more, not less.”

I thoroughly enjoyed this, it’s a great continuation of the series. It picks up directly where the previous book left off, with them rowing away from the island of Cairnholm. The high stakes were great, the time sensitive mission added a lot to the story. I also like the new additions and knowledge about the peculiar world we received.

“This second novel begins in 1940, immediately after the first book ended. Having escaped Miss Peregrine’s island by the skin of their teeth, Jacob and his new friends must journey to London, the peculiar capital of the world. Along the way, they encounter new allies, a menagerie of peculiar animals, and other unexpected surprises.

Complete with dozens of newly discovered (and thoroughly mesmerising) vintage photographs, this new adventure will delight readers of all ages”Summary from Goodreads.

“We aren’t so different. Outcasts and wanderers all—souls clinging to the margins of the world.”

Read More

This Savage Song by V.E. Schwab | Review

Disclosure: Please note that links to merchants mentioned within this post might be using an affiliate link which means that – at no extra cost to you – I might earn a commission if you buy something through that affiliate link.

Cover for This Savage Song by V.E. Schwab surrounded by paper stars and tally marks

4 stars


“We each have a song. A piece of music that belongs only to us, something we’re born with, like a fingerprint.”

This Savage Song was different to what I imagined, not that I had a clear idea of what I expected. There was just a lot of hype about this book and the author all over Instagram when this book was published, and I always feel a little dubious whenever there is a lot of hype. But after reading the blurb I was definitely intrigued, and I thoroughly enjoyed it.

“There’s no such thing as safe in a city at war, a city overrun with monsters. In this dark urban fantasy from author Victoria Schwab, a young woman and a young man must choose whether to become heroes or villains—and friends or enemies—with the future of their home at stake. The first of two books.

Kate Harker and August Flynn are the heirs to a divided city—a city where the violence has begun to breed actual monsters. All Kate wants is to be as ruthless as her father, who lets the monsters roam free and makes the humans pay for his protection. All August wants is to be human, as good-hearted as his own father, to play a bigger role in protecting the innocent—but he’s one of the monsters. One who can steal a soul with a simple strain of music. When the chance arises to keep an eye on Kate, who’s just been kicked out of her sixth boarding school and returned home, August jumps at it. But Kate discovers August’s secret, and after a failed assassination attempt the pair must flee for their lives.” Summary from Goodreads

“The beautiful thing about books was that anyone could open them.”

Read More

Vassa in the Night by Sarah Porter | Review

Disclosure: Please note that links to merchants mentioned within this post might be using an affiliate link which means that – at zero cost to you – I might earn a commission if you buy something through that affiliate link.

Vassa in the Night by Sarah Porter lying on the tiles surrounded by paper stars

4 stars 

“Why did it take me so many years to understand that Night is something you can talk to, something that might even decide to watch over you or kiss you just when you’re about to crumple from loneliness?” 

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. A few book reviews I had seen online warned that it’s strange, and won’t be everyone’s cup of tea etc. well it was definitely mine. I was enthralled. I do agree that it does have an odd vibe, but I did not find it as strange as some people made it out to be.

“In the enchanted kingdom of Brooklyn, the fashionable people put on cute shoes, go to parties in warehouses, drink on rooftops at sunset, and tell themselves they’ve arrived. A whole lot of Brooklyn is like that now—but not Vassa’s working-class neighbourhood.

In Vassa’s neighbourhood, where she lives with her stepmother and bickering stepsisters, one might stumble onto magic, but stumbling away again could become an issue. Babs Yagg, the owner of the local convenience store, has a policy of beheading shoplifters—and sometimes-innocent shoppers as well. So when Vassa’s stepsister sends her out for light bulbs, in the middle of night, she knows it could easily become a suicide mission.

But Vassa has a bit of luck hidden in her pocket, a gift from her dead mother. Erg is a tough-talking wooden doll with sticky fingers, a bottomless stomach, and a ferocious cunning. With Erg’s help, Vassa just might be able to break the witch’s curse and free her Brooklyn neighbourhood. But Babs won’t be playing fair” (Summary from Goodreads)

Read More

Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake | Review

Disclosure: Please note that links to merchants mentioned within this post might be using an affiliate link which means that – at zero cost to you – I might earn a commission if you buy something through that affiliate link.

The paperback and hardback editions of Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake

4 Stars

Three dark queens, are born in a glen,
Sweet little triplets will never be friends.
Three dark sisters, all fair to be seen,
Two to devour, and one to be Queen.”

“In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions.
But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. And it’s not just a game of win or lose . . . its life or death. The night the sisters turn sixteen, the battle begins.
The last queen standing gets the crown.” (Summary from Goodreads)

I received two copies of Three Dark Crowns in October last year. The black hardcover was a part of Owlcrate’s ‘Darkness’ box and the paperback came in The YA Chronicles ‘You Win Or You Die’ box. This was the first time I purchased two book subscription boxes in a month, and was surprised to get the same book, although I know realise how common that is. However, since the covers are different, I don’t really mind. Plus Owlcrate’s came with a signed book plate and letter from the author so that was really cool. However, I prefer to read paperbacks, as they are lighter to carry around so I am quite happy to have both editions.

Full unboxing of the October Owlcrate Darkness box, containing its hardback copy of Three Dark Crowns and the misc. bookish items received with it.

Owlcrate October ‘Darkness’ Unboxing

I had no expectations going into Three Dark Crowns, I’d never heard of the book, but after reading the blurb on the book I was incredibly intrigued by the book’s premise. I was completely drawn into the world where three sisters are born with incredible gifts (or so we initially think) and are destined to kill each other. That part just breaks my heart, sisters having to kill each other; in fact, they are encouraged to do so.

Mild spoilers ahead, so please keep that in mind.

Read More

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs | Review

Disclosure: Please note that links to merchants mentioned within this post might be using an affiliate link which means that – at zero cost to you – I might earn a commission if you buy something through that affiliate link.

photo of Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children book beside a Halloween skull candy bowl.

3.5 stars

 

“I had always known the sky was full of mysteries—but not until now had I realized how full of them the earth was.” 

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children tells the story of Jacob Portman, and the stories his grandfather told him, the ones he daren’t believe were true.

“A horrific family tragedy sets sixteen-year-old Jacob journeying to a remote island off the coast of Wales, where he discovers the crumbling ruins of Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children. As Jacob explores its abandoned bedrooms and hallways, it becomes clear that the children were more than just peculiar. They may have been dangerous. They may have been quarantined on a deserted island for good reason. And somehow—impossible though it seems—they may still be alive.” [summary from Goodreads]

I’d heard about this book for a while, but since the movie has been announced, I decided that I needed to read the book before I saw the adaptation. I borrowed a copy from my friend and was surprised by how quickly I read it.

Read More

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén